Upgrade Your Brain: How to Spot a Common Mental Error That Leads to Misguided Thinking

Human beings have been blaming strange behavior on the full moon for centuries. In the Middle Ages, for example, people claimed that a full moon could turn humans into werewolves. In the 1700s, it was common to believe that a full moon could cause epilepsy or feverish temperatures. We even changed our language to match our beliefs. The word lunatic comes from the Latin root luna, which means moon. [click to continue reading]

The Akrasia Effect: Why We Don’t Follow Through on What We Set Out to Do (And What to Do About It)

By the summer of 1830, Victor Hugo was facing an impossible deadline. Twelve months earlier, the famous French author had made an agreement with his publisher that he would write a new book titled, The Hunchback of Notre Dame.

Instead of writing the book, Hugo spent the next year pursuing other projects, entertaining guests, and delaying his work on the text. Hugo’s publisher had become frustrated by his repeated procrastination and responded by setting a formidable deadline. The publisher demanded that Hugo finish the book by February of 1831—less than 6 months away.
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My 2015 Annual Review

Each year, I conduct my Annual Review and share it publicly. I do this because I find it helpful to review the successes and failures of the previous 12 months, but also because I think it is important to hold myself publicly accountable.

Similar to my previous Annual Reviews, I will answer 3 questions in my 2015 Annual Review:

  1. What went well this year?
  2. What didn’t go so well this year?
  3. What am I working toward?

2015 was an incredible year for me, but I also failed on several fronts. The good stuff is in Part I, the bad stuff is in Part II, and the future is Part III. I hope you find it useful and interesting.
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The Value of Time: How Much is Your Time Really Worth?

Not all uses of time are equal and this simple truth can make a big difference in life.

People who spend their time doing more profitable work make more money. People who spend their time investing in others build better relationships. People who spend their time creating a flexible career enjoy more freedom. People who spend their time working on high-impact projects contribute more to society. Whether you want more wealth, more friendship, more freedom, or more impact, it all comes down to how you spend your time.

If you’re like me, you probably want the things listed above (friendship, freedom, impact) and others too (health). But you can’t have everything at once, so you need to understand how to effectively manage the tradeoffs that you face on a day-to-day basis.

This article explains how to figure out what your time is worth and use that information to spend your time more effectively. Understanding how to get the most out of your time starts with knowing—in exact terms—what your time is worth.
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One Research-Backed Way to Effectively Manage Your Stressful and Busy Schedule

About twenty years ago, a group of college students at Stanford University headed home for winter break. While they were gone, they were given the task of keeping a daily journal.

In this journal, some of the students were asked to write about their most important personal values and then describe how the events of each day connected with those values.

Another group of students was simply asked to describe the positive events that happened throughout their day.

When the students returned to school after the break, the researchers discovered that those students who wrote about their personal values were healthier, experienced fewer illnesses, and had better energy and attitude than the students who merely wrote about the positive events in their lives.
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Free Download: Transform Your Habits (3rd Edition)

Today I am excited to release the 3rd edition of Transform Your Habits, my popular guide on habit change and behavior science. Transform Your Habits has been downloaded over 150,000 times and it is the highest-rated habits book on Goodreads.

This guide is filled with some of my best writing on the science of forming better habits and the 3rd edition features an expanded section on how to break bad habits.

Servant leadership is one of the core values I mention in my annual Integrity Reports and so I am happy to offer Transform Your Habits a free download to members of our wonderful community.
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The Diderot Effect: Why We Want Things We Don’t Need — And What to Do About It

The famous French philosopher Denis Diderot lived nearly his entire life in poverty, but that all changed in 1765.

Diderot was 52 years old and his daughter was about to be married, but he could not afford to provide a dowry. Despite his lack of wealth, Diderot’s name was well-known because he was the co-founder and writer of Encyclopédie, one of the most comprehensive encyclopedias of the time.
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